Weekly Roundup: Health care news and notes

Every Friday NCQA gives a rundown of some of the health care news stories from the past week. Here are some of our picks for this week:

  • A doctor explains how to approach the subject when patients don’t ‘do’ vaccines. [The New York Times]
  • The American Medical Association (AMA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced a partnership to educate doctors to screen patients for diabetes. [WebMD]
  • A government-commission report states raising tobacco purchase age to 21 would substantially decrease the number of 15- to 17-year-old smokers. [The Wall Street Journal]
  • A new published study says that hospital ratings on social media appear to reflect quality of care. [Medical Xpress]
  • Senate and House leaders released a bipartisan Medicare physician payment reform bill. [Energy and Commerce Committee]
  • Alternative payment models have encouraged the development of team approaches to care management. [RAND Corporation]
  • Five years after the Affordable Care Act was signed, there is a narrower gap between favorable and unfavorable views of the law. [Kaiser Family Foundation]
  • Three health care leaders discuss what quality measures should be used to evaluate health care. [The Wall Street Journal]
  • Awareness of physician quality report cards increased by 3.7 percent. [AJMC Journal]
  • A recent guideline concludes that routine electrocardiograms do not improve patient outcomes. [The New York Times]

 

 

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