Weekly Roundup: Health care news and notes

Every Friday NCQA gives a rundown of some of the health care news stories from the past week. Here are some of our picks for this week:

  • New evidence health spending is growing faster again. [The Wall Street Journal]
  • Some insured patients still skip care because of high costs. [Kaiser Health News]
  • Telemedicine, mobile health care apps bring medical care to you. [CBS News]
  • Insurer uses patients’ personal data to predict who will get sick. [Kaiser Health News]
  • Online doctor ratings do not use valid measures of quality and medical expertise. [US News]
  • White House launches new preventive health campaign. [The Hill]
  • Incentives for care coordination and quality make a big difference in patient centered medical home initiatives. [Health Affairs Blog]
  • House passes bipartisan bills to strengthen Medicare for seniors. [Ways and Means]
  • JAMA calls for development of quality measures for physical and behavioral health integration. [JAMA]
  • Most Americans know little about Supreme Court health case. [The Washington Post]
  • These are the average payments Medicare makes to every medical specialty. [Modern Healthcare]
  • Repealing the Affordable Care Act would leave 19 million uninsured and raise the federal deficit. [The National Journal]
  • Most Americans say drug costs are ‘unreasonable,’ although they can still afford to buy them. [Kaiser Health News]
  • Antibiotics are effective in appendicitis, a study shows. [The New York Times]
  • Not-for-profit hospital tax breaks double in a decade, but are they deserved? [Modern Healthcare]
  • Patient-centered medical home is a “pragmatic” shift in care. [Health IT Analytics]
  • Paperwork inconsistencies are causing thousands to lose Affordable Care Act subsidies. [Kaiser Health News]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.